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Europe’s Refugee Crisis: What could possibly go wrong?

by John Brian Shannon | January 24, 2016

Since 2008, Europe’s leaders have employed unexceptional management-style techniques to deal with the global financial crisis, the Greek crisis, and the ongoing refugee crisis — instead of creating a grand overriding vision that large numbers of citizens could buy-into in order to craft an ever-better EU.

Supporters of anti-immigration right-wing movement Pegida in Cologne, Germany, January 9, 2016.

Supporters of anti-immigration right-wing movement Pegida in Cologne, Germany, January 9, 2016. Image courtesy of theindependent.co.uk

What the leaders of any nation must remember is that whether it be a country, a corporation or NGO, a grand overriding vision and a mission statement that a majority of participants can agree with and work towards is of paramount importance.

Words like, “nebulous” and “pedestrian” and “amorphous” have no place in such contexts. Yet we’ve seen that in the policy response to the global financial crisis, to the Greek crisis, and especially in regards to the millions of refugees streaming into Europe.

And now, due to a lack of proper direction for the new arrivals — as to what constitutes acceptable standards of behavior for male EU residents — serious problems have begun to appear. And if they can’t act in a civilized fashion (even with proper education and direction provided courtesy of the EU country they chose to reside in) then they must (quickly) be deported to the general region from whence they came.

Yes, these males are adults and we expect them to act appropriately. However, customs in one country may be very different than in others. Governments — not corporations or citizens, are supposed to inform new arrivals about the norms of human behavior in their new country.

Make no mistake, what we’ve seen in Germany is just the beginning. Much worse is in the offing as a number of huge festivals appear throughout Europe over the next few months.

The spectacular Kölner Karneval is set to start in a few days, a carnival that has been a part of Cologne’s cultural fabric since 1823, and begins with (you couldn’t make this up if you tried) Women’s Carnival Day on February 4th. (Face-palm)

What could possibly go wrong?

From seemingly small and disparate incidents wars have begun in Europe. Imagine a melee with thousands of women getting groped, accosted, robbed, raped or gang-raped by uncouth men of Middle Eastern descent throughout the week-long carnival in Cologne. Now imagine the repercussions if a number of German women or German police officers were killed, think how that might change Europe…

WWI was sparked by the killing of only two people, while the underlying cause of WWII could be attributed to the unfair conditions set on Germany after WWI by the Allied Powers via the Treaty of Versailles.

In an event that is widely acknowledged to have sparked the outbreak of World War I, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, nephew of Emperor Franz Josef and heir to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, is shot to death along with his wife by a Serbian nationalist in Sarajevo, Bosnia, June 28, 1914. — History.com

From a relatively small incident (the assassination of two important people) millions of wartime deaths and atrocities occurred because the politicians of the day let things drift — no doubt hand-wringing all the way.

The present amorphous EU refugee system is a recipe for disaster

It’s just a matter of time before something goes really wrong and thousands of people become injured or killed.

The lack of vision and leadership on the Europe/Middle East/North Africa (EMEA) refugee matter has, so far, been appalling.

I very sincerely hope that I’m wrong, but I think February 2016 is going to become another famous month in European history for all the wrong reasons.

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